Allergies - First Aid advice

 

 

Allergies occur when the body perceives a seemingly harmless substance as a threat and the immune system produces an inappropriate response.

 

Allergy is the most common chronic disease in Europe. Up to 20% of patients with allergies struggle daily with the fear of a possible asthma attack, anaphylactic shock, or even death from an allergic reaction.

 

In the 20 years to 2012 there was a 615% increase in the rate of hospital admissions for anaphylaxis in the UK.

 

Allergy U.K have reported that an estimated 21 million people in the U.K suffer with some form of allergy.  This figure includes 50% of all children.  These statistics show that allergies are an increasingly prevalent problem.   The severity of the allergy can differ from person to person, ranging from mild and simply inconvenient to a life-threatening anaphylaxis.

A person can develop an allergy to any substance and can also become allergic to something they have previously been able to tolerate. 

 

A specific protein contained in the substance will cause the allergic reaction.  Common substances people are allergic to include food such as nuts or shellfish, pollen, pet hair, chemicals such as hair dye, medications (such as penicillin and NSAIDS) and insects such as bees and wasps.

Symptoms can be varied and include:

·         Sneezing

·         Coughing

·         wheezing

·         Itching of skin and/or eyes nose

·         Rashes

·         Vomiting and diarrhoea

 

Allergic reactions are usually managed with avoidance of the substance that causes the allergy, but this is not always possible.

Medication can be used to treat mild-moderate allergic reactions and anti-histamines are widely available without prescription. Symptoms of the allergy can also be treated with medications such as steroid creams for rashes, nasal sprays for nasal irritation and emollients for eczema.

A severe allergic reaction can be life threatening and is known as Anaphylaxis.

Symptoms can include some or all of the below:

·         Swelling of the tongue, throat, difficulty in swallowing

·         Difficulty in breathing usually resulting in a noise known as stridor

·         Severe wheeze when breathing

·         Dizziness/collapse

·         Vomiting

·         Increase in heart rate

·         Rash (urticaria, hives)

 

If you suspect somebody is experiencing an anaphylactic reaction an ambulance needs to be called immediately. Treatment for anaphylaxis is an intra-muscular injection of adrenaline.  People who know they are at risk of an anaphylactic reaction will usually carry an auto injector so as to be able to treat themselves quickly in the event of a reaction.

Adrenaline is life saving and must be used promptly in anaphylaxis. Delaying the giving of adrenaline can result in deterioration and death. This is why using an adrenaline device is the first line treatment for anaphylaxis.

Here at Lubas medical we offer anaphylaxis training as part of our first aid courses. We can also provide a bespoke course to teach how to recognise an anaphylactic reaction and how to administer the recommended treatment.

For more information regarding allergies, and how to manage them visit:

www.allergyuk.org

You’ll find lots of useful information and a different article each day of allergy week highlighting a relevant topic.

 

 

 

 

Hi everybody, we're excited here at Lubas to say that we will be an exhibitor at this years annual Therapy Expo. 

Come visit us (in the area highlighted in orange!) and get updated on the latest CPR & Anaphylaxis guidelines announced in April. 

Delegates will be able to attend theory session's and then head straight to the training zone where they will carry out a practical with us! 

We will be rewarding certificates to all who successfully complete a practical session with us!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 So are you attending the Therapy Expo 2016? It'd be great to see as many of you as possible, we'd also love to hear what your looking forward to at this years Expo so don't forget to send us a tweet @lubasmedical or like us on Facebook and drop us message!  www.facebook.com/Lubasmedicalltd/

Want more info on the Therapy Expo? why not head over to their website and check it out! www.therapyexpo.co.uk

Also would you like more info on Lubas medical and the course's/services we provide? Head over to our website now. www.lubasmedical.com

 

 This week is child safety week raising awareness of the risks of childhood accidents and how we can prevent them.   There are potential risks around every corner for developing and inquiring minds. Hot pans being pulled from the stove, trips and falls, road safety, swallowing of poisons to name but a few. 

I have two children of my own and have had to deal with numerous accidents throughout their lives, falls, insect stings, illness and even the ingestion of medication.  Being a qualified nurse of 20 years and now a training officer for Lubas medical,  I feel prepared to cope with most situations, but when it comes to my own children things can always seem that little bit more worrying. It would appear I have not passed this anxiety onto them.   I remember my daughter probably about 8 at the time fell from the trampoline and was crying in pain, when I asked her what happened she said she there was no point in telling me because all I would say is “you’ll be okay” when I asked her is that what I always say she said “yes, but you’re always right”.  She cried for a little bit more and then ran off to play on the trampoline again.  There were times however when I didn’t know it would be alright and remember 2 ambulance rides with my son, one when he had fever, thankfully from tonsillitis and not meningitis and the other when his lips swelled due to an allergic reaction I am thankful that I knew the signs to look for that indicated to me he was very unwell, and knew the appropriate action to take.

 

Choking is a medical emergency that has always worried me and even more so where children are concerned.  We all know that children put everything and anything in their mouths indeed my inquisitive daughter was once found eating the dogs’ dinner! As a child I can still remember my mother hitting a friend of mine hard on the back to dislodge a fifty pence piece that was stuck in her throat, thankfully she lived to tell the tale, but tragically some children do not. 

We cannot wrap our children in cotton-wool nor supervise them 24 hours a day as they grow and seek independence, but we can prepare ourselves with knowledge and skills and be able to react what we should do when an accident happens.  The message of this child safety week is turn off technology, to become less distracted and look at the world around us and the potential risks it holds for our children. You could use this time to attend a first aid for parents course so you will be prepared if an accident should happen. We at Lubas medical can run such courses anywhere, playgroups, mother and toddler groups or even work places. Give us a call to arrange a course today.

http://www.childsafetyweek.org.uk/ 

 

 (https://www.facebook.com/events/238369713209241/ - Facebook event page)

(http://www.lubasmedical.com/lubas-medical-courses/course-info/first-aid-for-parents - Course page for booking and more info)

Allergy Awareness Week

Posted by Chris

Allergies - First Aid advice

25th April-1st May is allergy awareness week

 

Allergies occur when the body perceives a seemingly harmless substance as a threat and the immune system produces an inappropriate response.

 

Allergy U.K have reported that an estimated 21 million people in the U.K suffer with some form of allergy.  This figure includes 50% of all children.  These statistics show that allergies are an increasingly prevalent problem.   The severity of the allergy can differ from person to person, ranging from mild and simply inconvenient to a life threatening anaphylaxis.

A person can develop an allergy to any substance and can also become allergic to something they have previously been able to tolerate. 

A specific protein contained in the substance will cause the allergic reaction.  Common substances people are allergic to include food such as nuts or shellfish, pollen, pet hair, chemicals such as hair dye, medications (such as penicillin and NSAIDS) and insects such as bees and wasps.

Symptoms can be varied and include

  • Sneezing
  • Coughing
  • wheezing
  • Itching of skin and/or eyes nose
  • Rashes
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea

Allergic reactions are usually managed with avoidance of the substance that causes the allergy, but this is not always possible.

Medication can be used to treat mild-moderate allergic reactions and anti-histamines are widely available without prescription. Symptoms of the allergy can also be treated with medications such as steroid creams for rashes, nasal sprays for nasal irritation and emollients for eczema.

A severe allergic reaction can be life threatening and is known as Anaphylaxis.

Symptoms can include some or all of the below:

  • Swelling of the tongue, throat, difficulty in swallowing
  • Difficulty in breathing usually resulting in a noise known as stridor
  • Severe wheeze when breathing
  • Dizziness/collapse
  • Vomiting
  • Increase in heart rate
  • Rash (urticaria, hives)

If you suspect somebody is experiencing an anaphylactic reaction an ambulance needs to be called immediately. Treatment for anaphylaxis is an intra muscular injection of adrenaline.   People who know they are at risk of an anaphylactic reaction will usually carry an auto injector so as to be able to treat themselves quickly in the event of a reaction.

Here at Lubas medical we offer anaphylaxis training as part of our first aid courses. We can also provide a bespoke course to teach how to recognise an anaphylactic reaction and how to administer the recommended treatment.

For more information regarding allergies, and how to manage them visit:

www.allergyuk.org

You’ll find lots of useful information and a different article each day of allergy week highlighting a relevant topic.

 

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