An article for those involved in sport at grassroots level. 

Head injuries (particularly concussion) continue to be a major talking point at all levels of medical care in sport.

 

But how can we expect head injuries to be taken seriously or fully understood in professional sport, when most people at grassroots don't know the basic considerations?

 

It seems coaches, parents, players, managers (and some first aiders!) think head injuries are an area that only medical professionals need to worry about.

 

But a small amount of basic knowledge and understanding can help us all deal with head injuries.

 

Take a look at the recent picture below of James Milner clashing heads during a pre-season game v Napoli:

 

 

From a first aid perspective, think about which of the following you would be able to assess and manage:

 

1. Concussion or a serious head injury

 

Would you be able to assess for signs of concussion?

 

Could you assess for signs of other types of head injury like a fractured skull or compression?

 

Would you know when to remove the player and when to let them carry on?

 

2. Unconscious casualty

 

 

If the casualty collapsed and became unconscious, how would you manage them?

 

Should you move the casualty?

 

When would you consider calling 999?

 

3. Open wound

 

 

If the player has an open wound, could you control the bleeding?

 

Should the player carry on?

 

Are you prepared for the potential risk of infection to both you and the player?

 

If player welfare really is the number one priority, coaches, players, officials, parents and players should all be able to answer the above questions as a minimum.

Just this week, Newport County manager Mike Flynn questioned the reasoning behind an enforced extended period of rest for Antoine Semenyo following a concussion against Oxford United. As Semenyo is under 19, the F.A's rules dictate an additional 6 days' recovery. Rather than publicly suggest this is unnecessary and potentially undermine the ruling, it would be more helpful for Flynn to find out why this is the case.

 

Increased awareness and understanding of head injuries at grassroots football would only serve to help medical professionals and player welfare at all levels.

 

Click here for further information about Lubas Medical First Aid for Sport & Exercise (FASE) courses,

Combat Concussion

 

Whilst working as a medic covering a Taekwondo tournament in December 2017 I dealt with an incident of concussion. The competitor returned this year and I caught up with her to find out what happened after the event. I was not expecting the story that followed.

Carla, a black belt in Taekwondo, was competing in a sparring contest. She was wearing the appropriate safety equipment including head guard and gloves.

I became concerned about the competitor after she received a blow to her head. She became unsteady on her feet and so the bout was stopped. I removed her from the ring, and she began to complain of nausea and photosensitivity. We moved to a quieter area as the noise levels were beginning to become a problem for her. Following a full assessment my immediate impression was that she was concussed and should not continue in the tournament. 

The assessment revealed that it was difficult for her to answer certain questions. She answered Maddocks questions with no problems, it was when I began filling in her details on my treatment record that she struggled. She was unable to recall her phone number and revealed that she hadn’t been able to remember things for a few days after hitting her head on a concrete archway in a friend’s house.

She began to drop her level of consciousness and I became increasingly concerned, especially as this was her second head injury in the space of a week. Although haemodynamically stable I felt her dropping level of consciousness, nausea and photosensitivity meant I needed to refer Carla to a Doctor as a matter of urgency. I was concerned that this could be a serious head injury, possibly an intracranial bleed. I called 999 and unusually a doctor, nurse and paramedic were on the ambulance that was sent. 

A concussion was diagnosed by the doctor, with the advice to see her own GP on her return to Devon. She left Cardiff that evening with somebody keeping a close eye on her during the long car journey home.

I contacted her in the days following and she said she was feeling tired but generally better. When I caught up with her she told me of her difficult year since.

It was a few weeks after the initial diagnosis of concussion that her symptoms began to worsen. Whilst attending another Taekwondo tournament, as an observer, her friends became concerned when she became vacant and began slurring her words. They quickly took her to hospital.

Numerous scans were performed and thankfully there was no evidence of a life threatening bleed. Following a detailed examination of Carla and her ongoing symptoms a diagnosis of post-concussion syndrome was made. She continued to experience impaired vision finding herself unable to focus for any length of time. 

The extreme tiredness that she encountered restricted her everyday life including her ability to return to work. Concentrating for any length of time lead to exhaustion, even the simplest tasks became difficult. The making of simple decisions such as what to eat for tea were now a challenge. Reading and listening to music became impossible. It took four months before she was back at work as a classroom assistant. This was facilitated by her occupational health department who developed an activity/sleep schedule to aid her rehabilitation. 

Her mental health suffered, experiencing emotional discomfort the year since her injury. Thankfully she has been supported through this with counselling sessions and is now taking medication to ease her depression.

Although some symptoms remain, especially travel sickness and tiredness, things are improving and for the first time in over a year she has returned to exercise. Her involvement with Taekwondo continues, and whilst she has been advised not to spar again, working as an instructor Carla continues to inspire young people to take up the sport. 

When teaching on our First Aid for Sports and Exercise (FASE) and Sports Trauma Management Courses, we stress the importance of recognition and correct management of concussion.

Keeping up to date on any change in guidelines and published research allows us to keep our information current. Hearing directly from someone who has experienced a serious concussion has helped us to understand it’s long-term effects and the impact it can have. 

Kind thanks to Carla Dunne for allowing us to share her story.  

Voucher Terms and Conditions

Posted by chris

Voucher Terms and Conditions

 

  •   By entering this competition, you confirm that you have read and fully understand the following terms and conditions.
  •  Competition details form part of these terms and conditions.
  • To enter the competition, Tweet using the Twitter hashtag provided by Lubas Medical.
  •  Competition winner will be picked at random from all entries via Twitter.
  •  Voucher valid until 25th November 2018.
  • £50 discount voucher may be used on any Lubas Medical Ltd course or product.
  • No refund or transfer will be offered if the winner cannot attend the chosen course after booking confirmation is complete. 
  •  Entry is open to residents of the UK except employees (and their families) of Lubas Medical Ltd, its printers and agents, the suppliers of the prizes and any other companies associated with the competitions.
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  • All entries must be made directly by the person entering the competition.
  • No responsibility can be accepted for entries lost, damaged or delayed in the post, or due to computer error in transit.
  • The prizes are as stated, are not transferable to another individual and no cash or other alternatives will be offered.
  • The winner(s) is (are) responsible for expenses and arrangements not specifically included in the prizes, including any necessary travel, accommodation, travel documents, passports and visas.
  • Prizes are subject to availability and the prize suppliers' terms and conditions.
  • The promoters reserve the right to amend or alter the terms of competitions at any time and reject entries from entrants not entering the spirit of the competition.
  • In the event of a prize being unavailable, the promoter reserves the right to offer an alternative prize of equal or greater value.

 

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Description generated with very high confidence

Competition Terms and Conditions

  • By entering this competition, you confirm that you have read and fully understand the following terms and conditions.

 

  •  Competition details form part of these terms and conditions.

 

  •  To enter the competition, fill in your correct details on the Lubas slip provided and place in the competition box.

 

  •   Competition winner will be picked at random.

 

  •  Free course place valid until 25th June 2018.

 

  •  Voucher may only be used on Lubas Sports Trauma Management and Lubas Wound Management courses with available spaces.

 

  •  No refund or transfer will be offered if the winner cannot attend the chosen course after booking confirmation is complete.

 

  • Entry is open to residents of the UK except employees (and their families) of Lubas Medical Ltd, its printers and agents, the suppliers of the prizes and any other companies associated with the competitions.

 

  • The entrant(s) must be aged 18 or over. Proof of identity and age may be required.

 

  •  Use of a false name or address will result in disqualification.

 

  •   Entries that are incomplete, illegible, indecipherable, or inaudible (if made by phone) will not be valid and deemed void.

 

  •  All entries must be made directly by the person entering the competition.

 

  •   No responsibility can be accepted for entries lost, damaged or delayed in the post, or due to computer error in transit.

 

  •  The prizes are as stated, are not transferable to another individual and no cash or other alternatives will be offered.

 

  •  The winner(s) is (are) responsible for expenses and arrangements not specifically included in the prizes, including any necessary travel, accommodation, travel documents, passports and visas.

 

  • Prizes are subject to availability and the prize suppliers' terms and conditions.

 

  •   The promoters reserve the right to amend or alter the terms of competitions at any time and reject entries from entrants not entering the spirit of the competition.

 

 

  •  In the event of a prize being unavailable, the promoter reserves the right to offer an alternative prize of equal or greater value.

·        

Hi guys, we'd just like to provide you with some links regarding current guidelines 2017.

Firstly this is the new SCAT5 assessment tool 2017; 

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/bjsports/early/2017/04/26/bjsports-2017-097506SCAT5.full.pdf

Here is the child SCAT5 assessment tool 2017;

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/bjsports/early/2017/04/26/bjsports-2017-097492childscat5.full.pdf

Also here is the consensus statement on concussion in sport from the Berlin conference november 2016;

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2017/04/26/bjsports-2017-097699

We have updated our Sports trauma management course to comply with the latest guidelines. 

There has also been updates from the British Thoracic Society

Here are the all guidelines;

https://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/standards-of-care/guidelines/

Here are the guidelines for emergency oxygen use in ambulances, community and preā€hospital settings;

https://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/document-library/clinical-information/oxygen/2017-emergency-oxygen-guideline/web-appendix-5-summary-for-ambulance-and-prehospital-settings/

We hope this has been useful for you and we're happy to answer any questions you may have regarding these guidelines.

All Lubas course's are up to date with all current guidelines at the time of the course. 

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